Isles of Scilly Wildflower Of The Week - Ivy-Leaved Crowfoot

Isles of Scilly Wildflower Of The Week - Ivy-Leaved Crowfoot. 

Isles of Scilly Wildflower Of The Week - Ivy-Leaved Crowfoot. 

This week's Isles of Scilly Wildflower Of The Week was Ivy-Leaved Crowfoot - Ranunculus Hederaceus. 

Ivy-Leaved Crowfoot grows in wet sites on St Mary's and is declining. It has an unfortunate habit of growing in tractor tyre tracks which may explain why it is rare here.

It is lovely to see such a pristine white flower growing out of wet mud. The flowers are like a white buttercup 4-8 mm across and the leaves are round to ivy shaped. The seedheads bend down towards the mud when ripe.

There is a very similar Round-Leaved Crowfoot, but we don't get it here. What we do get, and the best place to see it was on Pool Green, St Martin's, is Brackish water-crowfoot. This is bigger and looks even more like a buttercup with yellow centred white petals. However, this year it was not visible as the surface of the pool was covered in an invasive water plant. Let us hope it recovers.

Ivy-Leaved Crowfoot is sold as an oxygen generator for shallow ponds on the mainland. It is a European species. Major threats to this little plant are habitat drainage and water pollution. And being run over by a tractor.

The botanical name, Ranunculus Hederaceus, means a plant with leaves like ivy that grows where frogs live, i.e. damp places. Ranunculus is the genus name for buttercups.

You can listen to Liz's Wildflower Of The Week below and Liz will have a brand new wildflower for you next Wednesday at 10:30am.